The Resolution Matrix

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Don’t forget to join #ShowYourWork!  

Come link up your favorite post from December and join the fun!

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Before I dork out and alienate you completely, let me first explain.  

 

I am analytical by nature; I can’t help it.  When I see a problem, my first reaction is to dissect it, understand the details, then solve it.  And it’s not enough to make a list of solutions.  I want a step-by-step list of prioritized tasks that will achieve my ultimate goal.

Just imagine how fun I am at parties.

When it comes to New Year’s resolutions, it’s not enough to make a list.  I can list 100 things I want to differently/better on any given day.  (Remember the 90/10 rule  from Monday?)

But I can’t tackle 100 resolutions.  It’s more realistic for me to tackle, say, 3.

What is an analyst to do?  Why, create a resolution decision matrix of course!  

For those of you that are popular not analysts, let me introduce you to matrices.  The matrix below is a way for me to evaluate each of my potential New Year’s Resolutions.  I listed my resolutions on the left and created a weighted system to determine how much achieving each resolution would impact my life in different ways (0 meaning ‘not at all’ and 3 meaning ‘a lot’) .

And now, I give you, an extreme example of dorkdom my Resolution Matrix!

 

Based on the outcome of my matrix, I need to offer more help to friends/family and drastically reducing screen time, whilst playing guitar and singing.

You know, in my spare time.

So now that I’ve completely dorked out, I ask you….

How do you select your New Year’s Resolutions?

I’m linking up with 

Mama’s

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Your comments are better than nerd glasses (which, I remind you, are totally in right now.)

Please leave one below!

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